The Eleventh National Clinical Conference on Cannabis Therapeutics May 2017 in Berkeley, CA

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Cannabis: Protecting Patients and Reducing Harm

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On May 18-20, 2017, Patients Out of Time will hold The Eleventh National Clinical Conference on Cannabis Therapeutics in beautiful Berkeley, California! The theme for the conference will be “Cannabis: Protecting Patients and Reducing Harm.” #Patients2017

2016 Faculty, Baltimore, MD
2016 Faculty, Baltimore, MD
At The Eleventh National Clinical Conference on Cannabis Therapeutics, faculty from around the world and across the US will present on their state-of-the-art scientific and medical research findings and clinical experiences, as well as cutting edge legal strategies and organizing tactics. While intended for health care professionals, this conference will be of great benefit for patients, legal professionals, and the public who wish to educate themselves about this remarkable plant.

marina36Immediately prior to the main conference, on Thursday May 18th, Patients Out of Time will offer continuing education workshops. Over the years our pre-conference workshops have given us the opportunity to partner with other, specialized organizations working on medical cannabis, including Veterans for Medical Cannabis Access. These workshops are suited for people at all levels, from the novice to the most seasoned. This year, we’re pleased to offer workshops in four separate areas of focus, providing training for Physicians & Health Care Providers, Nurses, Attorneys, and Patients.

If you are on Twitter, the hashtag for this event is #Patients2017, and be sure that you’re following @PatientsOOTime for up-to-the-minute news, information, and conference updates!

This interdisciplinary event will also offer excellent opportunities to network with colleagues, and to review new products, services, and information from our Exhibitors! If you’re interested in exhibiting at The Eleventh National Clinical Conference, mmj17016-exhibitor-form-2017, fill it out, and email it to laramie@patientsoutoftime.org.

Members of the media interested in covering the conference may click here to apply for credentials.

hotelWe negotiated an excellent room rate at the DoubleTree by Hilton Berkeley Marina, and we expect rooms to go quickly. Making your reservation using our group discount is easy. Just click here to get started.

If you call instead, the group name for the conference is:
Eleventh National Clinical Conference on Cannabis Therapeutics

And our group code is:
CAN

That group code is to be used when making reservations online as well as by phone. The phone number for reservations is: 800-559-4655

Patients Out of Time is a 501c3 and your contributions are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law, including donation of items for the auction and support for scholarship funds. If you are interested in donating any items for this year’s auction, please contact laramie@patientsoutoftime.org.

We have also set up a scholarship fund to which you can contribute via paypal (btw, you won’t have to have an actual paypal account for that, that service lets you bypass that and just use your credit or debit card). Your donations allow people who have a limited income – including patients, activists, and veterans – to reap the benefits of attending this world-class conference.

We’ll see you in Berkeley this May!

Previous Conferences
To get an idea of what’s in store in 2017, check out these video highlights from previous years:


Fallout From Cannabis Prohibition – from the 2016 Patients Out of Time’s Conference in Baltimore, MD. Featuring Neill Franklin from LEAP (Law Enforcement Against Prohibition), Jeff and Chris Mizanskey, Dolores Halbin, and Paul Bregman. Heart rending tales of the legal abuse of victims in the war on marijuana.


Why Are We Poisoning Our Veterans? PTSD, TBI and Suicide – from the 2015 Patients Out of Time Conference in West Palm Beach, FL
Presenter Bryan Krumm, CPN,MSN,APRN-BC, with Veterans Perry Parks, Bob Jordan, and Jacques Stiegelman


Alan Silber, Michael Cutler & Connie Elkins McKelvey present legal issues regarding Healthcare Providers and Patients access to Herbal Cannabis. (Portland, OR, 2014)


Conference Highlights – 2015, West Palm Beach, Florida


Slideshow – 2016, Baltimore, Maryland
This slideshow was created using photographs from the acclaimed photographer David Sygall whose portfolio spans from iconic 1967 Jimi Hendrix images to the present.

#Patients2017

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Supporting Patients Out of Time

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It’s easy to support the work of Patients Out of Time by becoming a member! You can also use the links below to make a tax-deductible donation securely online via PayPal. You can even direct your support toward scholarships to our next national clinical conference on cannabis therapeutics, which will be held in Berkeley, California, May 18-20, 2017!

Make A Donation To
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Free Webinar – Streaming Live May 10 6-8pm eastern time

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Dr. Dustin Sulak, regarded as one of the world’s leading practicing experts on medical cannabis, will be presenting a free public seminar on how medical cannabis can provide a major solution to the opioid addiction epidemic. As part of the presentation, Dr. Sulak will talk about how cannabis has helped many of his own patients with opioid addiction and the latest findings from scientific studies worldwide on this subject.
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“We are in the throes of an opioid abuse crisis and are desperately searching for an answer. It’s time we acknowledge the solution that’s right in front of us and make this life-saving treatment available for those dependent on opioids. Cannabis has been proven to relieve chronic pain while reducing and replacing the use of opioids. It also relieves the symptoms of opioid withdrawal and decreases opioid craving. There is no toxic or lethal overdose of cannabis, and thousands of patients in Maine are already effectively using cannabis to replace opioids and other addictive substances. “ Dr. Dustin Sulak

He will discuss how medical cannabis, like any other legalized medicine, requires proper dosing procedures along with patient and provider education. Dr. Sulak will introduce Healer.com, a free comprehensive medical cannabis education resource for patients, the public and medical professionals. Access www.Healer.com, to learn how to best use cannabis, find your correct dosage, and achieve optimal therapeutic results.

When: May 10, 2016
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Tickets: FREE, Go to www.Healer.com/events
Where: USM, Hannaford Hall.
The FREE event will be livestreamed online.

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The Tenth National Clinical Conference on Cannabis Therapeutics

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Cannabis: A Botanical Medicine

Patients Out of Time comes of age this year–celebrating our 21st year as the leading source of accredited education on the newly discovered endocannabinoid system and the therapeutic use of natural cannabis!

baltimore_harberWe hope you will join us at the Baltimore Harbor Hotel for The Tenth National Clinical Conference on Cannabis Therapeutics, April 14-16.  The 2016 theme – Cannabis: A Botanical Medicine – is in celebration of this remarkable plant.  This interdisciplinary conference will bring together leaders in the herbal/botanical world with cannabis/cannabinoid researchers, clinicians, patients and caregivers. Our faculty includes speakers from Canada, Israel, Hungary, Scotland, Spain and across the US. Here’s a tentative agenda (as of Feb 10). A complete agenda and full list of faculty will be posted soon. More information and registration available here.

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Registration Open for 10th National Clinical Cannabis Conference April 14-16, 2016 in Baltimore, MD

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Cannabis: A Botanical Medicine

Patients Out of Time comes of age this year–celebrating our 21st year as the leading source of accredited education on the newly discovered endocannabinoid system and the therapeutic use of natural cannabis!

baltimore_harberWe hope you will join us at the Baltimore Harbor Hotel for The Tenth National Clinical Conference on Cannabis Therapeutics, April 14-16.  The 2016 theme – Cannabis: A Botanical Medicine – is in celebration of this remarkable plant.  This interdisciplinary conference will bring together leaders in the herbal/botanical world with cannabis/cannabinoid researchers, clinicians, patients and caregivers. Our faculty includes speakers from Canada, Israel, Hungary, Scotland, Spain and across the US. A full list of faculty will be posted soon.

POOT_clock_smallPrior to the main conference, we will hold several pre-conference Workshops on Thursday, April 14th. For health care providers new to medical cannabis, we encourage you to attend an overview of the endocannabinoid system, dosing methods, and legalitiesClinicians should see the new science on dosing with cannabis, including animal-study results followed by individualized human dosing and lab-tested cannabis formulations. For lawyers, policy makers, and practitioners interested in legal issues we have a seminar that provides CLEs while teaching dispensary and banking rules, medical necessity, and using science in defense strategy. And finally, we are offering a workshop designed especially for our military Veteransand their family members to help them understand the potential value of medical cannabis and their rights related to the use of this medicine.

POOT_clock_smallWith 23 medical cannabis states and an additional 17 states with CBD-only cannabis laws, it is imperative for health care providers to understand how to use this botanical medicine, the relative risks and benefits, as well as how it interacts with the endocannabinoid system. Patients are using this medicine and they look for guidance from their health care provider. Along with presenting state-of-the-art science, this conference offers an excellent opportunity to network with colleagues and see new products and sources of information from our Exhibitors.

POOT_clock_smallAnd don’t forget to register for the Friday night benefit dinner! Along with a great meal, we will have a live auction and comedy by the Wise Quacks from Canada! Not to be missed!

Click here to register.

Make your hotel reservations early, we expect rooms to go quickly! Smartphone/mobile device users, note: We’ve learned that the hotel’s mobile site is experiencing temporary problems in processing registrations, so though it is working for desktop users, people are currently unable to make hotel reservations for the conference using their celphone’s browser. They are working to resolve the problem and they hope to have their mobile site fully functional soon. Meanwhile, reservations can be made using a desktop device, or you can call the hotel directly at 1.855.695.6691, using the conference registration code POD12A.

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“Cannabis for posttraumatic stress disorder: A neurobiological approach to treatment,” Nurse Practitioner, Jan. 16, 2016, Vol. 41, Issue 1

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Cannabis for posttraumatic stress disorder: A neurobiological approach to treatment
Krumm, Bryan A. MSN, RN, CNP, BC
Published in Nurse Practitioner, Jan. 16, 2016, Vol. 41, Issue 1, pp. 50-54.

Author Information
Bryan A. Krumm is a Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner at Sage Neuroscience Center, Albuquerque, N.M.

The author has disclosed that he has no financial relationships related to this article.

Abstract: The endocannabinoid system is intricately involved in regulation of the neurobiological processes, which underlie the symptomatology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This article discusses the neurobiological underpinnings of PTSD and the use of cannabis for treating PTSD in the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program.

PDF copies of the full article are available free from http://journals.lww.com/tnpj/Fulltext/2016/01000/Cannabis_for_posttraumatic_stress_disorder__A.6.aspx

doi: 10.1097/01.NPR.0000434091.34348.3c

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“The truth about marijuana,” Guest Column by Ken Wolski, The Times of Trenton (NJ), Oct. 1, 2015

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Guest column originally published by The Times of Trenton, Oct. 1, 2015.

By Ken Wolski

The article, “Under the influence” (Times of Trenton, 9/27/15) is full of misinformation about marijuana. It is a good example of why we are not making any progress in reducing the harms that are associated with drug use.

Dr. Singh is quoted as saying that marijuana can lead “users to be at higher risk for developing psychosis.” This is nonsense. There has never been a cause/effect relationship proven between marijuana and mental illness in over 100 years of scientific study. It may well be one of the most studied issues of all, going back to the Indian Hemp Drugs Commission Report of the Nineteenth Century.

The rate of schizophrenia worldwide is remarkably stable, regardless of whether you look at a country with a high rate of marijuana use or a low rate of marijuana use. Moreover, marijuana use in the general population in the U.S. soared between 1949 and 1995, while the schizophrenia rate remained stable.

Even the DEA acknowledged (in the Federal Register, Vol. 76, #131, 7/8/11), “Extensive research has been conducted recently to investigate whether exposure to marijuana is associated with schizophrenia or other psychoses…At present, the data do not suggest a causative link between marijuana use and the development of psychosis.”

Dr. Singh also repeated the myth that marijuana is a “gateway drug” and then he admits that marijuana is “not necessarily itself a problem (but it) can open the door to the use of other, more dangerous narcotics.”

The Gateway Theory was popularized in the early 1970’s when there was a general cultural realization in America that the government was lying about marijuana. Since 1937 the federal government had been insisting that the use of marijuana inevitably led to “insanity, criminality and death.” But millions of young Americans used marijuana in the 1960’s and they found that marijuana was more likely to lead to peace, love and happiness.

The Gateway Theory was an acknowledgement that previous information about marijuana was inaccurate: “Maybe marijuana isn’t as dangerous as we said it was, but it can lead to more dangerous things.”

Still, it is difficult to understand what “more dangerous” drug marijuana can possibly lead to when the federal government has resisted all attempts to change marijuana from its Schedule I status. From 1970 to today, marijuana remains a Schedule I drug, in the same class as heroin, i.e., equally as dangerous as heroin. Schedule I drugs are MORE dangerous than all drugs in Schedules II – V, including cocaine, methamphetamine and all prescription drugs. According to the federal government, there simply is no more dangerous drug in the world than marijuana.

But let’s be real. There are more dangerous drugs than marijuana and marijuana can help individuals who are addicted to these drugs. Marijuana is actually a “reverse gateway” or “exit” drug. A recent study by the Berkeley Patients Group of 350 medical marijuana users in California found that 40% used marijuana to control alcohol craving, 66% used it as a replacement for prescription drugs, and 26% used it as a replacement for other, more potent illegal drugs. Indeed, a study published in the 2014 Journal of the American Medical Association noted that “States with medical cannabis (marijuana) laws had a 24.8% lower mean annual opioid overdose mortality rate compared with states without medical cannabis laws.”

Dr. Sanjay Gupta, who was President Obama’s original choice to be U.S. Surgeon General, said, “We have been terribly and systematically misled (about marijuana) for nearly 70 years in the United States.” This misinformation, fed by decades of junk science, continues. NIDA, which refuses to allow research into the benefits of medical marijuana, and only permits research into its harms, is an important part of this misinformation. The federal government still insists that there are no accepted medical benefits of marijuana. This, despite the fact that 23 states have passed laws recognizing marijuana as medicine, over a million Americans use marijuana with a physician’s recommendation, scores of healthcare organizations endorse medical marijuana, and an entirely new field of science, based on the discovery of how marijuana actually works in the human body–the Endocannabinoid system–is emerging.

No drug is completely safe and marijuana is no exception. But exaggerating the dangers of marijuana does a disservice to honest educational efforts about drug abuse. The Times article “Under the influence” seems greatly concerned about the diminishing perception among high school students that there is a “great risk” from smoking marijuana regularly. This is simply a reflection of a dawning cultural awareness of marijuana’s relative dangers. Rather than drag out tired, old, and thoroughly repudiated Reefer Madness scare stories to oppose this, the Times should instead focus on the public health dangers that are associated with marijuana prohibition. The criminal and civil penalties that are associated with marijuana use do far more harm to students and adults than marijuana could ever do.

Ken Wolski, RN, MPA, is the executive director of the Coalition for Medical Marijuana–New Jersey, Inc.

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